We “still” have a law called “Jantelagen” in the north

Jante is a fictional law formulated by Aksel Sandemose in the book “A refugee crosses his tracks” (1933).
Aksel Sandemose grew up in Denmark Nykøbing Mors, a city he was in the book called Jante, hence the name “Law of Jante”.
Jante formulate in words the unwritten law that says you can not pick up and think you are better than others in any way.
Jante is often linked to culture in many parts of Scandinavia, particularly in the past when the majority lived in rural areas and small towns and in touch with the outside world was smaller, giving less room to change.

Jante commandments are:

Do not think that you are special.
Do not think you are as good as ours.
Do not think that you are smarter than us.
You must not fool yourself into thinking you are better than us.
Do not think you know more than us.
Do not think that you are more important than us.
I’m curious why we still talk about this old law up in the north 2010?
For you to better understand what the “Jantelagen” is:
Do not think that you are good at anything.
Do not laugh at us.
Do not think that anyone cares about you.
Do not think that you can learn anything.
In the book, added later an eleventh commandment, which is usually called “the Jante penal code”. It is formulated as a question and says: You do not think we know something about you?
This is interesting because this past week I was again reminded about this old  fictional law formulated by Aksel Sandemose in 1933.
So today 2010, in Lulea, we still refer to this fictional law, 77 years later, even though Jante is often linked to cultures when the majority lived in rural areas and small towns and where the influences from the outside world was smaller, giving less room to change.

“Be the change you want to see in the world.”  Mahatma Gandhi

“Change is inevitable -exept from a vending machine. ” Robert C. Gallagher

“Your theory is crazy, but it’s not crazy enough to be true.” Niels Bohr

“Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.” Niels Bohr  

Enjoy
/a

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